Abstracts

The National Defense Industrial Association’s (NDIA) Undersea Warfare Division invites authors of high-quality professional abstracts to submit their work for technical presentation at the 2024 Undersea Warfare Fall Conference. Each abstract must be UNCLASSIFIED and cleared for public release with unlimited distribution (Distribution A). Each abstract should fit into one of the following Technical Sessions:

  • Aviation Systems
  • C4I
  • Mine Warfare
  • Undersea Sensors
  • Undersea Vehicles
  • Combat Systems

Individuals are required to submit a concise abstract of 4,000 characters or less by June 10 at 8:00 am EDT. Authors will be notified whether their abstract has been accepted by July 15, 2024.


Tracks:

Aviation Systems

The Aviation Committee focuses on the technologies and capabilities that the airborne undersea warfighting community provides. This committee is interested in a wide range of aviation platforms to include manned and unmanned fixed and rotary winged aircraft. The committee articulates contributions made by artificial intelligence/machine learning, signal processing, human factors, training, undersea capable weapons, sensors, man-machine interface, littoral and large area search concepts. The presentations cover a range, including theoretical discussions by academic institutions and laboratories, reports and roadmaps on experimental systems and systems being developed for Fleet introduction, and discussions of Navy programs of record.

C4I

This session will focus on Communications, Information Exchange, Data Fusion and Command and Control enablers for the ASW Kill Chain F2T2EA (Find, Fix, Track, Target, Engage and Assess).  Systems/concepts of interest include both EM and acoustic communications, and C2 systems like USW DSS and CV TSC.  For this session, we have two focus areas.  First, both concepts and applications of Non-Geostationary Satellite Orbits (NGSO)/PLEO (Proliferated Low Earth Orbit) satellite communications.  Second, agility in both existing and conceptual C4I systems.  This includes shifting to a more modern code base, modern architecture, modern development environments – but would also include rapid delivery processes, better operator to machine interfaces (more intuitive- with a lot of good work being done here with AI/ML tools), as well as better training and guidance.

Mine Warfare

The Mine Warfare (MIW) session provides the opportunity for industry, government, and academia to exchange information and express their views in addressing technical, programmatic, and operational issues and activities in the MIW community. The Committee addresses threats, programs, operations, CONOPS, and future technologies across the MIW spectrum of mine hunting, mine sweeping, neutralization, command and control, mining, and other areas of interest.

Undersea Sensors

The focus of the Undersea Sensors session is to provide guidance to the U.S. Navy about the application of cutting-edge technology. Abstracts submitted to this section relate to the following: underwater acoustic transduction and acoustic sensor arrays, electro-optic sensors, magnetic sensors, electrostatic sensors, chemical sensors, gravity sensors, signal processing, test and evaluation, operational use/sea test results, and theoretical studies. This list is not exhaustive but representative of several disciplines and associated sciences.

Undersea Vehicles

The Undersea Vehicles session focuses on both large and small hull undersea vehicles (both manned and unmanned) and unmanned surface vehicles. Technical subjects cover the broad areas of weapons, unmanned vehicles, defensive systems and hull, mechanical and electrical systems. The technical presentations range from theoretical discussions by academic institutions and laboratories, reports on experimental systems and systems being developed for Fleet introduction, to discussions of Navy programs of record.

Combat Systems

This session will focus on ASW/USW Combat Systems. BYG-1, SWFTS, SQQ-89, Aegis, USV/UUV C2 systems, etc.  Specifically, we will focus on agility—increasing the pace to integrate and employ new capabilities in a tactically relevant timeframe.  This includes shifting to a more modern code base, modern architecture, modern development environments – but would also include rapid delivery processes, better operator to machine interfaces (more intuitive- with a lot of good work being done here with AI/ML tools), as well as better training and guidance (so Sailors don’t have to invest 6-9 months learning the changes before they can use them).  Additionally, we would like abstracts related to readiness/reliability of those same systems.

Undersea Warfare Conference